Steampunk Affair

Yesterday, we attended a Steampunk Ball, and though we didn’t get to actually dance, it was still quite fun. There was a costume contest and the girls participated. Starshine won the kids contest, though all 4 participants were actually well-garbed. I’ll keep my commentary short since there are several photos to share. Here are the costumes, completely done and being modeled by the folks of Kittles Family Artworks.

First up…Magiba

Dress-Simplicity pattern 2843 view C. I cut the size 8 pattern but cut to the short length of the size 14 because she didn't want a ruffle and needed more length. I made a strap for the little bag out of burlap, gold mesh metallic trim and an antique button. I added some French-ish charms to her clock necklace, the dress and petticoat were made with cotton fabrics and lace. The yoke of the dress was made with a polyester fabric of some kind. The three buttons on her dress came from my great-grandmother's stash, I think. She wore white opaque tights and black ballet flats.

Dress-Simplicity pattern 2843 view C. I cut the size 8 pattern but cut to the short length of the size 14 because she didn’t want a ruffle and needed more length. I made a strap for the little bag out of burlap, gold mesh metallic trim and an antique button. I added some French-ish charms to her clock necklace, the dress and petticoat were made with cotton fabrics and lace. The yoke of the dress was made with a polyester fabric of some kind. The three buttons on her dress came from my great-grandmother’s stash, I think. She wore white opaque tights and black ballet flats.

Starshine…

Alicebot Automaton was created using a vintage Simplicity pattern (mentioned in a previous blog post). I worked on her inner workings all along the way. The black and grey tights really finished off the Alice in Wonderland look, while the nut-n-bolt hat topped it splendidly. She wanted to wear her Converse, so I relaced them using black jewelry chain (with a reminder for her to be careful lacing and unlacing them). I folded some aluminum foil, 4 or 6 times and using a thread spool that was close to the symbol's size, I made two circled with a permanent black marker. Using a lead pencil with the lead retracted, I free-handed the Converse design. Using a bead reamer, I 'tin-punched' the design into the foil. I peeled off the top layer of foil so the black circle wouldn't show and using a small star brad from my scrapbooking supplies, I secured the foil circles to the shoes. I had to use the bead reamer to make a hole in the center of the Converse emblem on the shoe but it stayed really well, all things considered. She wore her black armwarmers and I used a small amount of gold, metallic green, and black facepaint (a very small amount just to give a sheen) to better show she was an automaton. She has sensitive skin so I have to be careful how much I use. I'm still hunting for better facepaints.

Alicebot Automaton was created using a vintage Simplicity pattern (mentioned in a previous blog post). I worked on her inner workings all along the way. The black and grey tights really finished off the Alice in Wonderland look, while the nut-n-bolt hat topped it splendidly. She wanted to wear her Converse, so I relaced them using black jewelry chain (with a reminder for her to be careful lacing and unlacing them). I folded some aluminum foil, 4 or 6 times and using a thread spool that was close to the symbol’s size, I made two circled with a permanent black marker. Using a lead pencil with the lead retracted, I free-handed the Converse design. Using a bead reamer, I ‘tin-punched’ the design into the foil. I peeled off the top layer of foil so the black circle wouldn’t show and using a small star brad from my scrapbooking supplies, I secured the foil circles to the shoes. I had to use the bead reamer to make a hole in the center of the Converse emblem on the shoe but it stayed really well, all things considered. She wore her black armwarmers and I used a small amount of gold, metallic green, and black facepaint (a very small amount just to give a sheen) to better show she was an automaton. She has sensitive skin so I have to be careful how much I use. I’m still hunting for better facepaints. We strung her owl pocketwatch on a black leather cord so it wouldn’t scratch the “glass” door of her inner workings. She put the trim and the buttons on her apron and helped with some of the hat pieces.

Nojo…

Nojo dressed in a steampunk style more than focusing on adding gears and things of that nature. His hat was discussed in a previous post. We added some interesting trim to the faux pockets on the vest and the buttons were shaped like gears. He wore his welding goggles, a striped button down shirt, a nifty belt and a pair of navy work pants. His outfit was finished off with a pair of black shoes. Simplicity is sometimes pretty eye-catching!

Nojo dressed in a steampunk style more than focusing on adding gears and things of that nature. His hat was discussed in a previous post. We added some interesting trim to the faux pockets on the vest and the buttons were shaped like gears. He wore his welding goggles, a striped button down shirt, a nifty belt and a pair of navy work pants. His outfit was finished off with a pair of black shoes. Simplicity is sometimes pretty eye-catching! (You’ll notice our black tom cat in the lower right of the photo. He seemed determined to photo-bomb our pictures so I allowed him to stay in this one.)

Melody…

Those who were following my old blogger blog have seen some of these pieces before. I've been trying to put a steampunk costume together for a couple of years now. I wore the shirt I made and blogged about earlier. The underbust bustier top was from a gypsy costume pattern, made reversible because I like versatility. It laces up the back. The skirt is from a simplicity pattern and modified to show the petticoat underneath. The 'petticoat' is actually a ruffled skirt I purchase at Old Navy several years ago. It's one of my favorites. I topped my outfit with one of Starshines casual hats. I used one of my dad's old belts and hung a crocheted water bottle bag from the belt. The bag contained several things a Steampunk traveler like myself might need. I finished off my outfit with my distressed leather boots.

Those who were following my old blogger blog have seen some of these pieces before. I’ve been trying to put a steampunk costume together for a couple of years now. I wore the shirt I made and blogged about earlier. I added a fancy bustier top over that. I found that top on the clearance rack at Forever 21 and I don’t think I paid more than 1 dollar for it. Some of the beads were coming off so I replaced that section with some steampunk-styled findings I worked up. The underbust bustier top was from a gypsy costume pattern, made reversible because I like versatility. It laces up the back. The skirt is from a simplicity pattern and modified to show the petticoat underneath. The ‘petticoat’ is actually a ruffled skirt I purchase at Old Navy several years ago. It’s one of my favorites. I topped my outfit with one of Starshines casual hats and a pair of dangling mobius flower earrings I made. I used one of my dad’s old belts and hung a crocheted water bottle bag from the belt. The bag contained several things a Steampunk traveler like myself might need. I finished off my outfit with my distressed leather boots.

John…I saved the most intricate piece for last…

Steampunk Military Style. - I used McCall's pattern 4864 which was for a Colonial costume. It was a bit further back in history but since military jackets of that whole era were along the same lines, it translated really well in the end. It was an unadorned jacket pattern. I had to figure out where to put all the braid and trim on my own. I shared about the medals in earlier posts. I also shared the making of the decorative military chain in an earlier post. One thing I truly love about the dress uniforms of the military during the era of Steampunk is the seemingly haphazard placement of the medals. It makes it terribly easy to decide where to put them. John wore black slacks and his black military dress shoes.

Steampunk Military Style. – I used McCall’s pattern 4864 which was for a Colonial costume. It was a bit further back in history but since military jackets of that whole era were along the same lines, it translated really well in the end. It was an unadorned jacket pattern. I had to figure out where to put all the braid and trim on my own. I shared about the medals in earlier posts. I also shared the making of the decorative military chain in an earlier post. One thing I truly love about the dress uniforms of the military during the era of Steampunk is the seemingly haphazard placement of the medals. It makes it terribly easy to decide where to put them. John wore a white shirt underneath the jacket, black slacks and his black military dress shoes. It’s interesting how the black jacket looks navy in this photo. I used black suedecloth fabric to make it and lined it with cotton gauze. I knew he’d be wearing several layers so I tried to plan according to that.

So, there you have it. We are the Steampunked family at Kittles Family Artworks. Which costume is your favorite? Feel free to leave a comment.

Kittles Family Artworks...Steampunked!

Kittles Family Artworks…Steampunked!

In every real man a child is hidden that wants to play.ย  ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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4 thoughts on “Steampunk Affair

  1. Tracie Gale says:

    These are incredible and for lack of a different word to come to mind, just AWESOME!! Well done on ALL of them!! Y’all look amazing!

    Like

    • Thanks! If you would like to see more photos from the event, I share those on my other blog… Muddled Mawkishness and Murky Musings. We had a lot of fun and the folks at the event seemed to like the costumes, too! Thanks for your comments and for stopping by so faithfully! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

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